Retired Engineers Inspiring the Next Generation

A recent report from the Royal Academy of Engineering has highlighted a shortage in engineers, with an estimated 1 million new engineers and technicians needed by 2020.

Project Duration:
1st November 2016—Ongoing

Overview

One of the key causes of the current skills shortage is the perception that younger people have of what a career in engineering could look like.

In partnership with My Future My Choice, LinkAge has been working to inspire the future generation of engineers, by engaging them with those over the age of 55 who have previously had a career in the industry.

Purpose/Objectives

The project aimed to:

  • Raise awareness of opportunities for young people in the engineering industry;
  • Learn about engineering history, especially in Bristol.

For senior participants:

  • Share their experience, skills and knowledge of engineering with young people;
  • Become a role model for young people;
  • Increased confidence and self worth;
  • Reduce isolation and loneliness;
  • Opportunity to inspire young people.

For younger people:

  • Learn from older people who have experience of the engineering industry;
  • Access to opportunities that may help with career choices;
  • Have fun
  • Reduce stereotypes.

Participants

  • The older people (15 in total) were retired engineers from across the City (aged 55 to late 70’s), some of which currently volunteer on the Balmoral Ship or the harbourside cranes.
  • The young people (12 in total) were from year 9 (13/14years) at Bedminster Down Secondary School in South Bristol.

The older people were recruited through our LinkAge networks and the young people were chosen by the school based on who may benefit most.

Activities/ events

On Tuesday 1st November, students from Bedminster Down School were joined by a group of local older people and older volunteers of the MV Balmoral and the MShed Cranes, to share their experience and knowledge of engineering.

The day started with the older and younger people being split into 5 teams that would then work together throughout the day. As an icebreaker, the groups were given five minutes to introduce themselves to other members of their team, before introducing the older person within their group to the rest of the room. This was the first chance for both generations to find out more about each other, whilst gaining experience and confidence in talking in front of a group of people.

The first session was led by Hugh and Glynn and explored the topics of lifting things beyond human limits and investigating force and control. The groups were then tasked to build a working hydraulic crane out of card, syringes and plastic tubing. To create a successful crane, the groups need to work as a team, whilst also utilizing their individual skills. The cranes would be used later in the day for a small competition.

Throughout the day, each team had 2 breakout sessions led by the older volunteers, to look at the ships mechanics and the harbourside cranes. On board the ship the volunteers took each team down into the engine room, to look at what makes the ship work and what kind of issues could arise when at sea. There was a lot of discussion from all the groups around similarities and differences between an engine this size and how it compares to a large cruise ship. Each team also got to experience controlling the cranes on the harbourside under the guidance of the knowledgeable volunteers, who explained the history and the workings of these iconic cranes.

Both the younger and older people who were involved in the day expressed how much they enjoyed themselves and how it was a great opportunity for both generations to come together to share skills and knowledge.

Ricky Bush, LinkAge’s Senior Intergenerational Development Worker said, “This was a superb opportunity for older people who have had a career in this industry, to share their passion and experience with the younger generation, who will soon be making decisions about the direction that they will be taking in their careers. It was great to see everyone working together regardless of their ages and learning together how technology and robotics has developed.”

Benefits for the Community

  • Improved community cohesion;
  • More understanding of different generations.

Benefits for the Younger People

  • Better understanding of career opportunities in the engineering industry;
  • Reduced stereotypes of older people.

Benefits for the Older People

Gave them an opportunity to share their experiences and skills with a younger generation.

Funding

We managed to find a business to fund the days sessions.

Evaluation

How did you evaluate this project/activity?
Through report writing and case study.

What would be done differently in the future?
Raise the publicity of the event to more people to showcase this type of work.

Sustainability/ Developments

Linkage would like to deliver more of these sessions going forward but this will be dependent on funding.

Local Priorities

LinkAge has 5 years’ experience of delivering intergenerational projects within Bristol. We are committed to ensuring that the work we undertake across the generations is a meaningful and valuable experience for both the older and younger people and that there is a two way exchange of knowledge, skills and/or experience.

This project is part of the wide variety of intergenerational work LinkAge deliver.

Contact

Ricky Bush
Senior Development Worker, LinkAge

The Park Centre, Daventry Road, Bristol, BS4 1DQ

Visit website ›
Tel: 0117 3533042